Gardening Articles: Edibles :: Vegetables

Cooking and Storing Corn (page 3 of 5)

by National Gardening Association Editors

Cream-Style Corn

Hot pack - Husk, remove silks and wash the corn. Cut the kernels off the cobs at two-thirds of their thickness. To make the cream, scrape the cobs but do not cut them. Measure the corn and add one pint of boiling water to each pint of corn. Heat to boiling, then pack immediately into hot pint jars only, leaving one inch of headspace. Adjust lids. In a pressure canner at 10 pounds of pressure, process pints for 1 hour and 25 minutes.

Cold or raw pack - Husk, wash and scrape the kernels as you would for hot pack. Pack the corn loosely into hot pint jars and cover with boiling water, leaving one inch of headspace. Adjust lids. In a pressure canner at 10 pounds of pressure, process pints for 1 hour and 35 minutes.

Drying Sweet Corn

This old-time method is a good,low-energy way to have sweet corn on hand all winter.

Use freshly picked sweet corn, and prepare it as you would for freezing. Husk the ears. Don't worry if the silks cling; they'll come off easily after drying. Blanch the cobs in boiling water for 2 minutes. This "sets" the milk inside the kernel. Drain and cut the kernels off the cobs.

Spread the kernels on trays for drying. Dry for two to three days in the sun, bringing the trays indoors at night. The kernels can also be dried in an oven or dehydrator set at 120oF for 12 to 18 hours. Stir the kernels occasionally and keep them separated -- they're dry when they have shriveled and are hard. Shake off the dried silks and store the dried kernels in airtight containers. They should keep indefinitely.

To cook: Cover one cup of dried corn with 2 cups of boiling water and simmer, covered, for 50 minutes or until the corn is plump and tender. One cup of dry corn yields about two cups of cooked corn.

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