Weed Library

Grassy Weeds |  Broadleaf Weeds |  Woody and Vining Weeds |  Control Measures

Broadleaf Weeds
Broadleaf Plantain
Canada Thistle
Chickweed
Curly Dock
Dandelion
Ground Ivy
Henbit
Horsetail
Lambsquarters
Mallow
Pigweed
Prickly Lettuce
Purslane
Ragweed
Shepherd's Purse
Smartweed
Sorrel
White Clover
Wild Garlic
Wild Violets
Woodsorrel
Black Medic
Buckhorn Plantain
Buttonweed
Carpetweed
Cinquefoil
Corn Speedwell
English Daisy
Hawkweed
Hop Clover
Indian Mockstrawberry
Prostrate Knotweed
Yarrow

Indian Mockstrawberry

 

Indian mockstrawberry (Duchesnea indica) grows into a dense ground cover in moist shade, and often invades shady swaths of lawn in all except the dry mountain states. Like cultivated strawberries, the plants have three-lobed leaflets, but the edges of Indian mockstrawberry leaves have rounded scallops rather than points. Pull or dig plants from lawns in spring before they bear yellow flowers or flavorless red berries. Repeat as needed for three years to eliminate established colonies. Although invasive, Indian mockstrawberry makes a good ground cover on moist slopes that are prone to erosion. Note that cinquefoil also has yellow flowers, but it has five leaflets rather than three.

Weed Control Techniques

Pulling. Most young weeds can be pulled from the soil. They will slide out most easily if you pull them when the soil is wet. Getting the root up is crucial, so think of the main stem as the root's handle, and grasp it as close to the soil line as you can. If you find that the weeds are breaking off at the crown as you pull, slip a kitchen fork, dandelion weeder, or similar tool under the weed, and pry and twist as you pull it up. Weeds that have taproots, such as dandelion and plantain, usually must be pried out. A flexible pair of waterproof gloves will keep your hands comfortable as you weed, and it's good to have a nice sitting pad, too. Let pulled weeds bake in the sun for a day or so before composting them. If pulled weeds are holding mature seeds, compost them separately in a hot, moist pile before using this compost in the garden.

Digging. Weeds that regrow from persistent roots must be dug. Use a spade or digging fork to dig spreading perennials, such as bindweed, Canada thistle, and quackgrass. Start digging a foot away from the plant's center to loosen the soil. Then lift the weed from beneath, which reduces how many root pieces are likely to break off and regrow. Dandelion, dock, and other weeds that grow from persistent taproots can be dug the same way, or you can use a special fork-like tool called a dandelion weeder to pry them up. Dig very large taproots that are difficult to pry loose. In lawns and other places where digging dandelions is not practical, use a sharp knife to slice off the leaves and the top inch or two of taproot at a diagonal angle. Some weeds that are easily pulled when the soil is moist must be dug from dry soil.

Photo courtesy of James H. Miller & Ted Bodner, Southern Weed Science Society, Bugwood.org
 
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