Urban Gardening

From December 2008 E-newsletter


Farewell from William Moss

A Kenyan reader sent this photo after receiving advice on early-fruiting orange varieties.
A Kenyan reader sent this photo after receiving advice on early-fruiting orange varieties.

Thank you for reading this newsletter. For the past couple of years it has been exciting to work with the National Gardening Association (NGA) to promote urban gardening and greening. We all know someone who has been touched by the downturn in the economy, and NGA is no different. Publication of Moss in the City has been suspended, but you will continue to find existing urban gardening content here and I hope to write new articles in the future.

NGA is a good organization with a noble mission. Please continue to visit NGA's Web sites. You'll find in-depth information about gardening with kids at KidsGardening.org. For gardening information and resources specific to your region, sign up for NGA's biweekly Regional Reports e-newsletter. NGA has dedicated staff working hard to present the best information and most useful tips.

For more than 10 years I have taught and trumpeted urban greening. From my home in Chicago I have connected with people throughout the world. You've read about many of these experiences in Moss in the City, and I've made an effort to provide information pertinent to every urban habitat in the U.S. You embraced the newsletter and I received gregarious feedback from all regions of the U.S. as well as Bahrain, Kenya, Mexico, Columbia, Australia, and even one letter from a Nigerian princess, who wants to give me a million-dollar inheritance in exchange for a small processing fee of a few thousand.

I began this newsletter with the rather mundane goal of explaining the hows of urban gardening. Your comments and queries inspired me to expand to ecology, habitat restoration, youth projects, environmental remediation, soil science, and community involvement. My favorite articles originated from your questions, and include:

Ponds in this restored bog are essential to the development of peat. (Photo courtesy of Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss Association)
Ponds in this restored bog are essential to the development of peat. (Photo courtesy of Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss Association)

As great as your comments were, it was even better to meet some of you in person at conferences and events throughout the country. Thank you for introducing yourselves and taking time to chat.

Although Moss in the City is on hold, this Moss still lives in the city, still greens, and continues to write articles and opinions for my personal Web site, William's Web. There, gardeners and greenies will find a wealth of data on horticulture, environmental science, travel, ecology, recipes, and more with an occasional dash of politics and history. It's a quality site. Unfortunately, the talented Kathy Bond Borie, who edited Moss in the City, isn't my William's Web editor (yet). But 2009 is going to be a great year for greening, so stay connected and keep writing to me.

Moss in the Garden editor Kathy Bond-Borie
Moss in the City editor Kathy Bond-Borie

Times are tough, and while some organizations are suffering, the greening movement as a whole — especially in urban areas — has too much momentum to stop. Urban greening offers fresh air, cleaner soil and reduced soil erosion, water filtration, storm water mitigation, reduced heat island effect, reduced crime, stress relief, enhanced emotional wellbeing, and scores of new jobs in various fields.

Once again, my thanks for your support and enthusiasm. Retain your passion. Stay curious. Continue to learn. And keep on greening!

William Moss


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