Gardening Articles: Health :: Cooking

Cooking and Storing Corn (page 2 of 5)

by National Gardening Association Editors

Keeping the Corn Harvest

You'll probably find yourself eating fresh corn on the cob almost every day during the fresh corn season, but you may also want to freeze or can enough corn to last through the winter.

For the best tasting results, use only freshly picked corn. Pick no more than you'll be able to can or freeze within two to three hours. Because corn loses its flavor and its sweetness quickly, you have to work fast during processing.

Freezing

Whole-kernel - Husk and wash ears. Scald 4 minutes in boiling water. Plunge quickly into ice water to cool. Leave in water about four minutes and then drain. Cut kernels from cob at about 2/3 their depth. Pack in freezer containers. Seal, label and freeze.

Cream style - This is the best way to use mature, starchy ears. Husk, wash, scald and cool ears as for whole- kernel corn. Cut kernels from cob at about half their depth. Scrape the cob with the back of the knife to remove juice and meat of the kernels. Pack in freezer containers, leaving 1/4 inch of headspace. Seal, label and freeze.

Corn on the cob - Husk and wash ears. Scald small ears (11/2 inches or smaller in diameter) 6 minutes; medium ears (11/2 to 2 inches across) 8 minutes; ears larger than 2 inches in diameter 10 minutes. Cool quickly in ice water for same amount of time as scalding. Drain. Pack in freezer containers or wrap ears individually in moisture- and vapor-proof film and place in plastic freezer bags. Seal, label and freeze.

To cook frozen corn on the cob with the freshest taste, place it unthawed in cool water. Bring the water to a boil and cook for 5 to 10 minutes, depending on the size of the ears.

Canning Whole-Kernel Corn

Hot pack - Husk, remove silks and wash corn. Cut whole kernels off the cob; do not scrape the cob. Measure the corn and place it in a large saucepan. For each quart of cut corn, add 2 cups of boiling water. Bring the corn and water back to a boil.

Pack the boiling hot corn into hot jars, leaving one inch of headspace, and cover with the hot liquid, again leaving one inch of headspace. Add 1/2 teaspoon of salt to pints, or one teaspoon of salt to quarts. Adjust lids. In a pressure canner at 10 pounds of pressure, process pints for 55 minutes and quarts for 1 hour and 25 minutes.

Cold or raw pack - Husk and cut the corn as you would for hot pack. Pack the corn loosely into hot jars, leaving one inch of headspace. Add 1/2 teaspoon of salt to each quart, if desired. Cover with boiling water, leaving one inch of headspace. Adjust lids. In a pressure canner at 10 pounds of pressure, process pints for 55 minutes and quarts for 1 hour and 25 minutes.

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