Gardening Articles: Edibles :: Herbs

Deborah Madison (page 2 of 2)

by Kathy Bond Borie

Slow Food

Slow Food

Slow Food has 65,000 members in 45 countries, and as a grassroots movement it's had some success stories. The organization is committed to saving a designated a list of delicious yet endangered food plants and animals — called the Ark of Taste — such as the 'Gravenstein' apple, 'Iroquois White' corn, red abalone, 'Sun Crest' peach, Delaware Bay oyster, and heritage turkeys. Heritage turkeys include four old varieties that are on the edge of extinction. They are no longer grown commercially because they don't have as large a breast as the commonly raised breed, 'Broad Breasted White'. But Deborah vouches for their "absolutely stunning" flavor. "There's no comparison between these birds and the mass-produced counterpart," she states. Slow Food drew attention to these endangered species a few years ago and recruited farmers to raise heritage turkeys, guaranteeing a fair price. The world population of these breeds has now doubled.

"That can be done with peaches, apricots, raw milk farmstead cheeses, a lot of foods that are delicious and important," says Deborah. Unlike another approach to saving endangered species by preserving them in a seed bank, Slow Food supports efforts to make these foods available for eating and enjoyment now.

"The belief is that by saving the food, we can preserve some of the cultural traditions that surround that food," Deborah adds. To her, enjoying the local flavors and community spirit at your nearby farmer's market is a good place to start.

For more information about Deborah Madison's work and books, visit: www.randomhouse.com/features/deborahmadison/

For more about Slow Food, visit: www.Slowfood.com

Viewing page 2 of 2
Donate Today

The Garden in Every School Initiative

Shop Our Holiday Catalog

— ADVERTISEMENTS —