Gardening Articles: Edibles :: Small Fruits & Berries

Transplanting Vegetables (page 2 of 2)

by National Gardening Association Editors

Transplant Care

Transplant Care

Set the plant in the hole, and add soil around the rootball, gently firming the soil as you go to eliminate air pockets. Once the hole is filled, create a shallow well around the plant, so that water will gather there instead of immediately running off.

Protect new transplants against cutworms. These common pests chew young stems right at ground level. One easy method is to loosely wrap a strip of newspaper around the stems. The paper should span from one to two inches above the soil surface to an inch or two below--this is the cutworm's territory. A collar made from several thicknesses of newspaper will last long enough for the stems to grow large enough to discourage cutworms. Don't wrap collars too tightly, and don't use plastic.

Water the plants gently but thoroughly. You'll need to check the plants frequently, and water as necessary to keep soil moist down to the depth of the rootball.

Planting Depth

Tomatoes are one of the few plants that can--and should--be planted deeper than their original soil line. Unlike most plants, tomatoes will develop roots along their buried stems. These additional roots will help anchor the large plants and will allow the plant to take in the nutrients and water it needs to product a good crop.

If you have a stocky, compact plant, bury the stem up to the first leaf.

If your plants are tall and leggy, pinch off the bottom few leaves, then set the plant sideways into a trench, carefully bending the top of the plant upward.

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