Southern California Coastal & Inland Valleys

September, 2000
Regional Report

Transplanting for Delayed Crops


Transplant seedlings after they've developed their second set of true leaves. Carefully thin seedlings in growing beds. If you transplant these to another area, they'll be harvestable about a week or two later than the plants left in the original bed. Mulch transplants to help the soil retain moisture during the rest of the summer, and add more mulch in October and November for frost protection.

Sowing Onion Sets

Sowing bulb onion seed now will provide green onions throughout the winter and small bulb onions in late spring. Dig any bulb onions up that you haven\'t eaten as green onions when their tops dry, and replant them as sets January. They will develop into full-size bulbs the following summer.

Vegetables for Salty Soils


Some vegetables such as asparagus, beets, kale, and spinach are more tolerant of salty areas in the garden. Salt levels may be naturally high or accumulate through repeated applications of manure or other concentrated fertilizers. It's best to avoid growing more salt intolerant vegetables such as celery, green beans, radishes, strawberries and most fruits in these areas.

Fall Reblooming Perennials


Remove faded blooms of perennials like coreopsis, Shasta daisies, delphiniums, penstemons, and yarrow. Cut them back to within six inches of the soil, water and fertilize and they may bloom again in fall. Divide clumps that are too large or ones that haven't bloomed much this year. Sidedress these plants with bonemeal and compost, and water well.

Sowing Delphinium Seed


Delphinium seeds need cool temperatures to germinate best. Refrigerate delphinium seeds now for planting later this fall. When ready to plant, start them on moist paper towels rolled loosely in plastic bags in the refrigerator. After they germinate, gently move the tiny plants into pots. When they're large enough, transplant them into their permanent garden spot.

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