Pacific Northwest

August, 2000
Regional Report

Plant Fall Vegetables


If you're planning a fall vegetable garden, now is the time to transplant broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, and Chinese cabbage. Protect these plants from pests by laying a floating row cover over the transplants. Late August is also a good time to direct sow carrots, beets, snap beans, and lettuce.

Avoid Sunburn


Long, sunny days and hot temperatures can lead to sunburn on some plants as well as people.
The best way to prevent sunburn is to know your plants' requirements for sun or shade before you plant them. If they are already in the ground and are getting sunburned (tan patches on the leaves of fruit), either transplant them to a better site or protect them with a shade cloth. Make sure your plants are getting enough water and fertilizer for optimal health and minimal stress.

Stake Tall Plants


Install supports around tall plants such as hollyhocks to help keep them upright during late-season wind and rainstorms. Slender reed or bamboo stakes long enough to reach up three-quarters of the plant's height work best. Put three or four stakes in the ground and weave supporting twine between them, starting about a foot above the ground. Add another weave a foot above the first.

Eradicate Weeds


Even though home gardens are well established by midsummer, weeds will continue to sprout and compete with garden plantings for water and nutrients. It's important to remove this weedy competition, and hand pulling is my favorite method. Other means of controlling weeds include using mulches, both organic and nonorganic. For example, a 1-inch layer of bark dust or sawdust will deter most annual weeds. A mulch of newspaper, five sheets thick, covered with bark dust, clean straw, or compost, will help control weeds and conserve soil moisture.

Water Early and Often


Water the garden early in the day so plants can absorb the moisture before the hot sun dries the soil. Early watering also improves the chance that the foliage will have time to dry before night. Wet foliage at night increases susceptibility to fungus diseases.

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