In the Garden:
Mid-Atlantic
August, 2000
Regional Report

Share |
889

Flowering sumac and goldenrod are sure signs of fall.

It's Fall Already

The wild goldenrod and sumac coloring so boldly together along the edge of the road stop me cold. The combination is beautiful, but to me, this officially signals the start of fall. It's too early!

Garden Signs of Fall

I've carefully ignored the other signs of fall's approach. Fluorescent red tupelo tree leaves, dropping at the excruciating rate of one leaf a day onto the lawn. Native dogwoods brushed in soft velvety russet, a whisper of what's to come. I've glossed over the crab apples darkening like rubies on the trees. Stepped around the Kousa dogwood fruits squished all over the library sidewalk downtown. Some signs are just more subtle than others.

Late Summer's Bounty

Late summer is a joy, however. Dahlias are in full flush, and the roses are blooming like there's no tomorrow. The blackberries are ready to harvest, and my fall peas and beans are up and looking good. The tomatoes found it a bit cool and cloudy overall, but I'm still picking zucchini! This is such a rich time in the garden.

Other Fall Bloomers

The seasons weave the rhythm of gardening for us. Today I'll pick from the goldenrod patch and scout for pale lilac fall asters along the woods edge. The upright, spiked seed heads of teasel, a fascinating old-time herb from Europe now turned into an invasive weed in my garden, add a dark contrast to complete the picture. Even the pokeweed, with its inky-purple berries, is coloring the landscape. Many of these wild plants have become cultivated garden plants. Whether in the garden or in the wild, they are signs of a changing season. Meanwhile, I guess I'd better keep an eye on the pumpkins in case they're turning orange already.


Care to share your gardening thoughts, insights, triumphs, or disappointments with your fellow gardening enthusiasts? Join the lively discussions on our FaceBook page and receive free daily tips!

GardeningwithKids.org Catalog

Special Report - Garden to Table

— ADVERTISEMENTS —