Southern Coasts

October, 2000
Regional Report

Recipes

Chicken and Anything Soup
Here's a classic soup recipe for the fall days and nights ahead. It uses garden vegetables and herbs, tastes great, and is easy to make, plus you'll probably stay healthier with a little chicken soup in your belly.



Ingredients

4-pound hen

2 teaspoons salt

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

1 large bay leaf

Coarsely chopped vegetables:

1 large onion

6 old carrots

6 old celery ribs

6 stems green onion

1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley



Preparation

Put everything in a big pot and cover with water. Heat just to a boil, then simmer covered for several hours, until the bird falls off the bone when you put a wooden spoon at its joints. Take out the bird and the vegetables. Continue to cook the soup, uncovered, until it reduces by about one fourth. Taste and adjust seasonings as it cooks. Cool the soup and strain it (if you want to - I do if I'm serving guests and want it to be very clear) by lining a colander with cheesecloth and pouring the soup right through into another big pot. Refrigerate the soup overnight and then remove the fat that collects on top. Reheat the soup and add cooked noodles, matzo balls, rice, and/or freshly cooked vegetables just before serving.



Serves 6 or more



Local Buzz

What's a Panola?
The hot news around here is the new hybrid annual cross between a pansy and a viola - the panola - bred in California just a few years ago and now showing up in garden centers across our area for fall planting.



So why should you care? The panola resolves the dilemma of whether to choose pansies for their multi-colored or violas for their tidy habits and floriferousness. The flowers are a bit smaller than huge pansies but bigger than violas, and many have faces. Plus they hold themselves very upright, they bloom until late spring in our area and even passed my thunderstorm test last year by perking back up the very next day and keeping right on blooming.



Panola's been named the Mississippi Medallion Winner for fall 2000. Look for seven single-color panolas - the red is a real dazzler - and a mix called 'Panola Panache'.



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