Pacific Northwest

June, 2012
Regional Report

Shows & Events

Flowers that Flirt and the Bees That Buzz Them
On Sunday, July 22, 2012, at Joy Creek Nursery in Scappoose, Oregon at 1:00 p.m., Glen Andresen will present an informational, outdoor workshop thatwill take a look at the some of the more common bee pollinators, the interaction between bees and flowers, and offer a tour of the nursery's many bee-friendly plants. Glen says "How drab our gardens would be without the vibrantly-colored flowers we grow. Of course, there wouldn't be nearly the diversity of these flowers without the work of a single family of insects -- bees! This family is composed of honey bees, bumblebees, mason bees, carpenter bees and many others, and they pollinate close to 70 percent of all flowering plants. In fact, there are thought to be about 250 species of bees in western Oregon alone." The class is free and open to the public. Be sure to dress for the weather. For more information, contact: Joy Creek Nursery at 503-543-7474, email Ramona@joycreek.com, or visit their webpage http://www.joycreek.com/education.htm.

Favorite or New Plant

Yarrow
Yarrows have fuzzy, fern-like foliage that adds texture to the garden bed. They're rugged sun-loving perennials and do best in average, well draining soils. One of my favorites is the variety called 'Paprika' (Achillea millefolium 'Paprika'), with reddish-orange blooms. It grows from 15 to 20 inches tall with a spread of 18 to 24 inches.

Yarrows get floppy if fertilized, so I plant mine in an out-of-the-way site. About the only maintenance they require is cutting back after the first flush of blooms. If you remember to give them a haircut, they'll reward you with a second flush of blooms later in the season.

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