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houseplants for dummies plant ID

houseplants for dummies plant ID
Posted by kira (gkbrunton@aol.com) from Ohio on 2002-08-22 15:33:31

Help! I simply must have this plant that I can't identify! The first page of the color section of Houseplants for Dummies has a line up of succulents and cacti that aren't identified. Does anyone know what the center plant is? It's the pale, milky green succulent with jelly bean shaped leaves. The publishing company says they can't help me!
Thanks so much!
  • Thanks for ID- now a question
    Posted by kira from ohio on 2002-08-24 21:34:53

    Thanks for the ID- I think it is the rubrotinctum. However, the picture has very little red tint. The plant is almost all creamy pale green. Does this just have to do with sun exposure? If I wanted to keep the red to a minimum, could I just keep it in indirect light? Would that have an adverse effect on the plant? Is there a variety of the same shape without the red tint? I'll stop now-:). Thanks for your help!
    Quoting Will Creed, Horticulturist: ------------
    -I don't have a copy of the book to refer to, but from your description, I would guess that the plant in question is a Sedum pachyphyllum or a Sedum rubrotinctum, commonly called Jelly-bean plant.

    -Quoting kira: ------------
    -Help! I simply must have this plant that I can't identify! The first page of the color section of Houseplants for Dummies has a line up of succulents and cacti that aren't identified. Does anyone know what the center plant is? It's the pale, milky green succulent with jelly bean shaped leaves. The publishing company says they can't help me!
    -Thanks so much!
    • Jelly-bean plant
      Posted by Will Creed, Horticulturist from NYC on 2002-08-25 17:07:29

      Hi Kira,

      Direct sunlight is the factor that controls the amount of redness. If you keep it out of direct sun, then it will stay green. In indirect light it wll grow more slowly and will use a bit less water, otherwise it will not affect the plant.

      There are lots of other Sedum plants, most of which will stay green even in direct sunlight.

      S. Pachyphyllum are light green with a powdery coating; S.rubrotinctum has shiny darker green leaves.

      Let me know if you have any other questions.


      Quoting kira: ------------
      -Thanks for the ID- I think it is the rubrotinctum. However, the picture has very little red tint. The plant is almost all creamy pale green. Does this just have to do with sun exposure? If I wanted to keep the red to a minimum, could I just keep it in indirect light? Would that have an adverse effect on the plant? Is there a variety of the same shape without the red tint? I'll stop now-:). Thanks for your help!
      -Quoting Will Creed, Horticulturist: ------------
      -I don't have a copy of the book to refer to, but from your description, I would guess that the plant in question is a Sedum pachyphyllum or a Sedum rubrotinctum, commonly called Jelly-bean plant.

      -Quoting kira: ------------
      -Help! I simply must have this plant that I can't identify! The first page of the color section of Houseplants for Dummies has a line up of succulents and cacti that aren't identified. Does anyone know what the center plant is? It's the pale, milky green succulent with jelly bean shaped leaves. The publishing company says they can't help me!
      -Thanks so much!

      Insiders' Plant Information

  • Thanks for ID- now a question
    Posted by kira from ohio on 2002-08-24 21:34:21

    Thanks for the ID- I think it is the rubrotinctum. However, the picture has very little red tint. The plant is almost all creamy pale green. Does this just have to do with sun exposure? If I wanted to keep the red to a minimum, could I just keep it in indirect light? Would that have an adverse effect on the plant? Is there a variety of the same shape without the red tint? I'll stop now-:). Thanks for your help!
    Quoting Will Creed, Horticulturist: ------------
    -I don't have a copy of the book to refer to, but from your description, I would guess that the plant in question is a Sedum pachyphyllum or a Sedum rubrotinctum, commonly called Jelly-bean plant.

    -Quoting kira: ------------
    -Help! I simply must have this plant that I can't identify! The first page of the color section of Houseplants for Dummies has a line up of succulents and cacti that aren't identified. Does anyone know what the center plant is? It's the pale, milky green succulent with jelly bean shaped leaves. The publishing company says they can't help me!
    -Thanks so much!
  • paging will creed- thanks, now a Q
    Posted by kira from ohio on 2002-08-24 21:33:23

    Thanks for the ID- I think it is the rubrotinctum. However, the picture has very little red tint. The plant is almost all creamy pale green. Does this just have to do with sun exposure? If I wanted to keep the red to a minimum, could I just keep it in indirect light? Would that have an adverse effect on the plant? Is there a variey of the same shape without the red tint? I'll stop now-:). Thanks for your help!
    Quoting Will Creed, Horticulturist: ------------
    -I don't have a copy of the book to refer to, but from your description, I would guess that the plant in question is a Sedum pachyphyllum or a Sedum rubrotinctum, commonly called Jelly-bean plant.

    -Quoting kira: ------------
    -Help! I simply must have this plant that I can't identify! The first page of the color section of Houseplants for Dummies has a line up of succulents and cacti that aren't identified. Does anyone know what the center plant is? It's the pale, milky green succulent with jelly bean shaped leaves. The publishing company says they can't help me!
    -Thanks so much!
  • Jelly-bean plant ID
    Posted by Will Creed, Horticulturist from NYC on 2002-08-24 20:13:59

    I don't have a copy of the book to refer to, but from your description, I would guess that the plant in question is a Sedum pachyphyllum or a Sedum rubrotinctum, commonly called Jelly-bean plant.

    Quoting kira: ------------
    -Help! I simply must have this plant that I can't identify! The first page of the color section of Houseplants for Dummies has a line up of succulents and cacti that aren't identified. Does anyone know what the center plant is? It's the pale, milky green succulent with jelly bean shaped leaves. The publishing company says they can't help me!
    -Thanks so much!

    Insiders' Plant Information

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