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sarccocoa ruscifolia, arbovitae ferns, autumn ferns, pittosporum varigated, cephalotaxus 'dukes garden'

sarccocoa ruscifolia, arbovitae ferns, autumn ferns, pittosporum varigated, cephalotaxus 'dukes garden'
Posted by Frances Callen (francesbcallen@yahoo.com) from Georgia on 2008-09-30 01:29:00

Within the last two years, We have planted all of the above plants in a partially shaded pine island that has three large pine trees and soil that seems to be sandy. None of these plants have grown very much since they were planted. Two months ago,we dug up and added some nature's helper to the soil in 4 out of 10 of the sarccocoa plants (planted in December 2006) to see if it made them grow better..my husband feels they are doing a little better but I don't think so - leaves are lighter and still look thinned out. This weekend we had a truckload of screened topsoil dirt delivered. We removed the arbovitae ferns, which are right next to the sarcoccoca, we added and tilled in up to 6 inches of new dirt into the area, and replanted the old arbovitae ferns along with some new ones. My question is do you think this is going to make a difference because of the trees close by? I want to dig up all the sarcocoas, cephalotaxis, and pittosporum and add some new dirt and replant them all. I'm struggling over which is the bigger problem, the bad soil or the tree roots that are not making these plants grow. I can fix the soil but if the tree roots are the main problem then fixing the soil is not going to help much or is it? Just don't want to throw good money after bad. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
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