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WEEDS, Weeds, weeds

WEEDS, Weeds, weeds
Posted by Kathy from on 2001-03-23 17:09:12

I have quite a large flower garden area
that has been let go over the last two
years. I have an enormous weed problem.
I have a lot pereniels planted and
would like to try to bring the garden
back. Is there something I can apply to
the garden area after pulling all the
dead weeds this spring which will not
hurt my flowers and then apply some
mulch heavily to the area to keep the
weeds from coming back with such
vengence? Please, if someone can help
me I would appreciate it. I live in the
midwest, so am anxious for winter to be
over and get busy.
  • Weeds, Weeds, Weeds
    Posted by Kimm from on 2001-03-23 17:10:05

    Depending on what "weed" you have most
    can be controlled by a good, heavy
    mulch while others may need some
    newspaper covered by a good, heavy
    mulch. The pre emergent herbicides are
    not necessary if your mulch is dense
    enough to keep those plants from access
    to sunlight which is what they need to
    grow. A good layer of vegetative mulch
    in your flower beds, minimum of 4
    inches and more is better, will keep
    those "weeds" fom getting any sunlight.
    Not cultivating the soil will also keep
    any "weed" seeds down in the soil from
    getting pulled to the durface where
    they have a better chance of
    germinating.

    • Weeds, Weeds, Weeds
      Posted by Karen from Michigan on 2001-03-23 17:11:41

      I use Preen. It only works if you apply
      it right after you pull all the weeds,
      and heavy mulch (at least 3 inches) on
      top of that should take care of the
      problem



      • Weeds, Weeds, Weeds
        Posted by B. Clarke from Ct on 2001-03-23 17:13:12

        The best method I have ever found is to
        weed the area and then put down a thick
        layer of newspaper, and then covering
        with mulch. 6 or 8 sheets thick is
        enough to stop any seed from sprouting
        and retains moisture beautifully, is
        easy to fit around established plants
        or poke holes for new ones, and best of
        all, it's free. Other benefits are that
        it composts in place, improving the
        soil and earthworms love it. Mulch over
        it as you normally would (2 to 3 inches
        is fine). If it is windy when you are
        placing it, wet it down and mulch as
        you go to hold it down.

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